Bowl under construction in Lombok, Indonesia.

The Power of Sharing – Building a bowl in Lombok, Indonesia

Wherever you go, there´s always somebody with a dream. However, sometimes there are only a few chances to turn someone’s dream into reality. “Sharing is the best way to make the chance bigger” said some friend to me while we were chilling in a small bar.

This is his experience with his dream of supporting skateboarders building a bowl in his home country Indonesia while living in Germany.

Bowl under construction in Lombok, Indonesia.
Bowl under construction in Lombok, Indonesia.

He collected old stuff from his German friends and tried to sell it to make money for the bowl´s construction and send the rest that couldn’t be sold to Indonesia.

He tried, but failed. Bureaucracy and distance made it impossible. He tried again, but the results was still not satisfying.

He was sad, but with every trial and tribulation, he started to become aware that he is not alone out there, and that there would always be someone to help realise his dream. Someone he just had to find.

Eventually he met this person. Her name is Dina.

It all started with a jam session in a small park. Then they became friends, spending every session on the hill together, talking during the breaks in which he told her about his country, until he finally revealed his dream.

After he’d shared the project and she got involved in the workflow, everything went well.

She did anything possible to raise funds. She sold her BMX, skateboard, longboard stuff & spare car parts and collected donations from local longboard businesses, like quinboards and Concrete Wave Cologne skate shop.

She collected anything from friends and her family that she could sell and of course she was asking for donations in several events like ISPO, Insul Race, etc.

Heavy rain filled up the bowl with muddy water.
Heavy rain filled up the bowl with muddy water.

Even her grandmother chipped in with some cash. Grandmas are the best. We know, it is not easy, it takes time, effort, patience and loyalty, things that I experienced, though not comparable to what she did.

One time she complained to me, “This sucks! I’m trying to sell a set of used wheels for 5 Euros, but prospective buyers still try to bargain the price by asking me : Does the price include postage?” Though life.

But, she kept doing it!

So, finally,  with the help from a local skateboard pioneer, Ozzie Anwar, who gave his land for the bowl location, the constructs started in the end of 2016.

Stoked kid shredding the half finished bowl in Lombok, Indonesia.
Stoked kid shredding the half finished bowl in Lombok, Indonesia.

Amazing.

Since then, he named the project “Project Love”. Just because she has done and still does everything based on love. This will be her third time to visit his country. Still with the same mission. To show her love for Indonesia and the local Skateboard scene. She´s on a special mission to finish this Project.

After hours of talks & glasses of beer, he ends our conversation with wonderful words, “Dreaming & sharing are two things with which everybody in this world can accomplish any task, no exceptions. So keep dreaming ‘n sharing it”.

So, I share this friends story to you all, to inspiring all of us. Share it, if you’re inspired 🙂

For traveller who’s gonna visit Indonesia, the bowl location is in Lombok, anyway, come over feel the warm people on the hot island!

Dina with Indonesian kids.
Dina with the Indonesian kids excited about skateboarding.

Update: Dina’s last post before flying

“I’m packing my bags for the trip to Indonesia and taking 1630 EUR with me! Folks, you’re awesome! Thank you so much for any donation, each wheel, anything you bought from me! For one year I’ve been selling any kind of stuff and all together collected 2494 EUR and had the pleasure to deal with kind-hearted and some pretty dimwitted buyers as well. Now the bowl not only is getting done, some money will be left over and a roof or something else supportive can be built as well.

One question I don’t want to hear anytime soon Did you send the package already? I definitely need a break from selling. 16th March is starting time, pictures will follow. Last but not least, THANKS!”

Team Heckmeck – Winter Gathering

Here we are, only few days until the last day of winter and the first day of spring. Six days later, on March 26th, something even better will happen…

We will switch to “standard time” and move our clocks one hour forward. Actually, our digital devices will most probably take care of it on its own, we’re covered 🙂 What matters the most is that we will get in that extra hour for skating in the afternoons, life will be good again.

Team Heckmeck dudes from Germany are ready to move on as well and wave the cold times goodby, at least for the next 6 months or so…

I caught up with Daniel Lenz via Skype the other day…Him and Moritz Dolainsky live near Munich, while the other two Heckmeck guys, Nils Bodenheimer and Jan Brebeck live near Mainz.

That’s like 400 km apart and 3 to 4 hours drive, but the guys get together to skate, film and have fun as often as possible, mostly on weekends.

Heckmeck’s latests videos, including “Winter Gathering”, prove it; As soon as there was a dry spot on their favorite runs, they went out and sent it…

Related: See more videos from Team Heckmeck

When it was the worst, they packed the stuff and travelled to Italy, down to Lake Garda and even Tuscany, to meet their new friends whom they’ve met at KnK Longboard Camp last year.

They spent time, were hosted by and shared the runs with Andrea Pedrotti, Degenerous Crew and Sborello Team.

As Daniel said; Italy is a big thing right now…Near the Adriatic sea, it offers nice winter downhill skateboarding conditions, especially down in Tuscany and around Genoa.

In case you get inspired to do a similar trip yourself, make sure to get in touch with the local crews and find out where it’s OK and safe to skate. Hopefully you can meet them and skate together, or even get a place to crash for a night or two…

Community spirit lives on…So good.

When I asked about Team Heckmeck’s plans for this season beside the usual shenanigans, Daniel explained that the crew wants to produce more videos that will show their skateboarding lifestyle as well as to expand the variety of action shot angles.

For the travelling part…Daniel and Moritz plan to hit the KnK Week #2 and then probably do “a small tour” through Italy, Switzerland and France, while Nils plans to skate at Alpenrauschen and race the Red Bull No Paws Down during the first week of KnK.

Fun times ahead, for sure. Stay tuned!

Shoutout to Jan Stein for filming with the car, Olson&Hekmati and ::asphaltinstrumente::.

Calum Yardley at KnK Longboard Camp 2016. Photo by Sickboards.

Longboard Magazine presents: Bear’s Guts Raw Run Cut feat. Calum Yardley

In early 2011 downhill skateboarding in Europe seemed to be more race oriented and people were skating the Bear’s Guts mostly hands down. Nowadays we see riders charging down at 80+ kph without a care in the world, doing fascinatingly long stand-up slides.

We also can not disregard the generation shift in the longboard community. With more and more grooms attending freeride events, the difference in skill levels between the younger and older generations is changing. Grooms are taking over with a fresh mentality as to what downhill skateboarding means to them and how they want to pursue it.

One of those youngsters is Calum Yardley, an 18 year old British, who was born and lives in Alicante in Spain. His 2016 season included visiting freerides in Spain and Slovenia, but also races in Czech and Germany.

Calum Yardley at KnK Longboard Camp 2016. Photo by Sickboards.
Calum Yardley at KnK Longboard Camp 2016. Photo by Sickboards.

As many of us, Calum loves traveling from event to event to challenge his skills and enjoy his time skating with a variety of people you meet at a longboarding event.

While we were talking, he remembered two little brothers at KnK whose parents are a great example of love and support for the passion their kids share.

At KnK, there were two little brothers, I think they were 9 and 11 years old, that really amazed me, even though in my group we have a kid that is only 12 years old and he started at 10. It is really amazing to see such variety of ages in the longboard community, and to know that it is growing, slowly but it is.

Calum also started skateboarding at a young age when he got excited about longboarding by watching videos online. When he was 13 he bought his first deck and was lucky enough to meet a skater, Derek Blanquer, who helped him step into the world of longboarding.

Related: Calum Yardley and Derek Blanquer | Vall D’ebo Raw Run

Since then, Calum says he’s coming up with crazy and fun ideas that make his skate sessions even more interesting and challenging. At KnK he grabbed the Alternative Hummingbird,  a cruiser with 16.7 inch wheelbase, and sent it down the Bears’s Guts track.

Root Shark compared to Alternative Hummingbird (complete) which Calum skates in the video. Photo by Calum Yardley.
Root Shark compared to Alternative Hummingbird (complete) which Calum skates in the video. Photo by Calum Yardley.

Later Calum ended up skating the cruiser for a full day and a half and even one run of the three qualification runs for the Cult Single Set Survivors. Although Calum didn’t win the race, because he dislocated his shoulder, he had an amazing time and would do it all over again. Here is what he had to say about KnK Longboard Camp:

I loved so many things about the event, from the very good organisation to the amazing community there was. The party nights where crazy and lit but you could go to sleep without a single problem. And if you stayed up late enough chilling and look up to the sky you get such an amazing view as well.

We also talked with Calum about what it means to be a sponsored rider. He told us this:

Well, most people would say that getting free stuff is the best thing of being sponsored, but it isn’t. It’s the doors that open for you, new adventures, new friends that you wouldn’t have probably met and the ability to try many new things…depending on the sponsor.

For example, if it wouldn’t of been for NICE Trucks, I would have only went to Kozakov last year, as I had a team mate that could pick me up and take me there, and he was going to many more events, so I decided to go to more events too and meet many awesome people.

Because he had such and amazing season last year, his future plans include traveling to longboarding events with his FreeDivision skate crew and test his skills on different roads and environments. His plan for now is to visit Kozakov again and probably one week of KnK to try to win the Red Bull No Paws Down race and as he says in a joke, to beat Patrick Lombardi, last year’s winner.

Let’s see 🙂

Calum Yardley is a team rider at NICE Trucks and FreeBrake.

Video was filmed and edited by Andrea Pedrotti.

Lillian Barou enjoying Switzerland on his Wrobel Alternative longboard

Alternative Longboards Wrobel with Lillian Barou

Last summer Lillian BarouBen Pellet and Brian Scott Adkins travelled around Switzerland in search of new skate spots. They came across this epic run and couldn’t refrain themselves from filming it.

This is a 9 a.m. run, not long after we woke up. It was only my 2nd run on the spot, but as you can see it’s very long so I couldn’t really memorise the track. So I sent it as I can: shredding, chilling, tucking and having fun. Lillian Barou

[youtube url=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CZDHRKmGt44″]

Lillian skates the Wrobel deck that is part of the current Alternative Longboards lineup. It features a classic directional shape, radial concave and a stiff flex. The length of the board is 90 cm with a width of 24.5 cm. Its design also provides multiple wheelbase options raging from 66 to 72 cm.

Alternative Wrobel: 1 Top graphic | 2 Fiberglass | 3 Carbon fiber| 4 Veneer | 5 Core | 6 Down graphic

Despite the simple design the Wrobel still performs great in different disciplines and riding styles. Its priced at 189 euro and available for purchase via Alternative Longboards website.

Stay tuned for the Alternative Longboards 2017 deck collection overview.

How we filmed One With Gravity, a DJI video featuring downhill skateboarding

The story of the recent video I filmed with DJI called “One With Gravity” actually begins a while back, on a muddy, narrow bike path surrounded by dog shit…

A couple of years ago, when my hometown Mainz was still a hotspot for downhill skateboarding and we had some more active skaters here, a bunch of my friends discovered a new spot.

A fortunate coincidence

A really narrow and steep bike path with some hairpins and a bench on a side is really challenging to skate (impossible with my regular dh-setup) but also a big fun. In case you got curious; My buddies Leon and Max made a little edit from that spot.

One day a dude came out of a house on top of the hill. He said he also owns a longboard but he never thought that it’s possible to go down that path with it.

He was all stoked and asked if he might take some footage with his new drone.

Of course he could, residents stoked about people skating right in front of their houses is probably one of the best things that can happen to someone like us.

What we didn’t know at that point was that the “guy with the drone” was actually Ferdinand Wolf, one of the best drone pilots in Germany, who just became the manager of the DJI Studio Europe.

Ferdinand Wolf (DJI Studio Europe) operating DJI Inspire 2 drone.
Ferdinand Wolf (DJI Studio Europe) operating DJI Inspire 2 drone.

He is a rad guy with a preference for everything that goes fast, from rally cars to jet skis and drones. We went skating and filming together a couple of times and when he realised how much cinematic potential our sport has, the idea for a real professional video project “One With Gravity” was born.

When Ferdinand finally got to me and said that he has organised a budget form DJI to make it happen, I was more than happy.

I have been involved in filming downhill projects before but it was never more professional than duct-taping a DSLR camera onto a hood and go – but this project was some levels above that and needed a lot of planning and organising to make it work out.

Finding the right spot for filming

The first thing to do was to find a proper spot. I know tons of awesome spots around Europe which are gnarly and have beautiful sceneries, but finding a spot which is also remote enough so that we could block the road for a couple days of filming and getting a permission to fly a drone, turned out to be way harder than I first thought.

I came up with a couple of really good ideas, but we always failed at the point where we had to get the permission for the drone.

After some fails, I’ve been told to try finding something in Portugal, because it’s one of the few countries in Europe with almost no limitations on flying a drone.

Portugal they said? No problem for my network of awesomeness; some emails with my bro and Cult Wheels team mate Jorge Pernes later and the spot was set.

The filming location for "One With Gravity" video in Portugal.
The filming location for “One With Gravity” video in Portugal.

A mega gnarly spot somewhere up in the high mountains of eastern Portugal, surrounded by breathtaking views and basically in the middle of nowhere.

Together with Pernes and the homie Pedro Roque, we had a great local team to take care of everything at the spot.

The first meeting with the film crew was a test shoot at one of our local spots.

It was necessary because the filmmakers never worked with downhill skateboarders before and we had to try the equipment and think about possible shots.

The team was pretty big and all of them were professionals which have been involved in cinema movies and stuff. They even got a permission to shut down the traffic for our runs. A high level of professionalism!

It was a fun day working with the guys and because it was only a few days before the euro tour would start, Pablo, Jasper and Robbie were around as well to shred some gnar.

After two more days of filming interviews and the process of building a board in Olson & Hekmati workshop, the day of a flight to Portugal was getting closer.

Because I had the best time travelling with my brother Maxwell Kaye during euro tour and the DJI crew asked for some additional background-skaters, I got Max on board to be a part of the team.

The adventure begins

In October, we finally got on the plane to Porto. After a quick but delicious francesinha and a Super Bock with my mate Joao from Cactus Dist we drove out into the mountains. Thank you again bro <3

I have been to Portugal before, but never really travelled around the beautiful hills of the east, where Spain isn’t far. It was definitely something I had missed so far; I didn’t expect to see such a beautiful landscape.

Maxwell Kaye and Jorge Pernes stoked about the buggy.
Maxwell Kaye and Jorge Pernes stoked about the buggy.

Far away from any big town and really high up I felt like being on another planet. It really smelt like mega gnarly spots all over the place, it almost made me sad to stay at the same place for the whole time…

The actual process of filming the video was very different than what I am normally used to.

Instead of just taking steezy runs with my homies over and over again while being filmed, it turned out to be real work (oh wonder =D).

Especially the “stunt” was really hard to perform – crashing on purpose over and over almost drove me crazy but I tried to give my best and in the end everyone (except my bearings. I never saw the bearings being that much f***** up…) was happy with the shot.

Another issue we often faced was the “speed thing”. Unlike driving a car or a similar vehicle you can’t just go down a hill on a skateboard slower but still taking the same line and do the same movements.

Many times I got told something like; “Alex, that looked really great! But please do the same thing again, just very slow”.

Due to the fact that there are no brakes and that the way you move on a board really depends on the speed, that is just impossible.

I have never really thought about this, but I think it is something that makes our sport very unique and natural…

Fortunately the film crew adapted quickly and we always found a way to figure it out.

Filming with the Wildcat-buggy was really interesting too.

The off-road suspension did not allow it to go around the corners very quick but it was impressive to see how they mounted that big camera gimbal on it. The follow runs were quite scary because I got really close in some corners but it was really enjoyable 😉

It was also really inspiring to work with Ferdinand.

He really knows a lot about filming and he controls his drones like a champ! Every time we were filming with the drone, I had a feeling that the footage will be incredible and he actually filmed enough great stuff to fill a whole hour of downhill action and breathtaking landscape.

Ferdinand Wolf instructing Jorge Pernes how to use the DJI Osmo X5R.
Ferdinand Wolf instructing Jorge Pernes how to use the DJI Osmo X5R.

Actually the whole aerial thing really amazed me. In most videos I miss the connection to the beautiful mountain ranges in which we usually hang out – showing a close shot of a rider and then flying out to show the panoramic view in the same take is a really cool way to make that connection.

Everything’s better with friends

Even though the production was hard work I really enjoyed the time with the film team and my fellow skate buddies.

Unfortunately Max got smashed on day one so he was forced to be the safety officer for the rest of the trip and made sure everyone else was happy.

Everything’s better with friends.

Even when we were sitting around in the cold for hours, waiting for the sun to come up or down for the lifestyle shots, the Portuguese spirit always spread laughter and a good time for everyone.

A big difference to normal skate trips was that we were staying in a really nice little hotel in the mountains (thanks to Paul, our host) with great breakfast and a fridge which was always full of delicious little Portuguese beers and got great lunch and dinner by a local restaurant – a priceless comfort when you work from dusk till dawn.

When the last day came, we all were really sore and tired, but super excited for the footage. The film business is really exhausting and from now on I will have even more respect for the guys who do that kind of hard work every day.

Final thoughts

There are some things that I would have done differently if I would have been the editor (fortunately I was not^^) but I think that this is the reason for the result to be such a high quality downhill video for a big audience, not just for longboard nerds like us.

What I really like is the “behind the scenes” edit, because it shows how the video was done and we can also see Max skating, Olli and Björn get their part and I’m saying something that was not scripted 😉

In the end I can just send out hugs and kisses to everyone involved. It was an unique experience and not everyone gets the chance to do something like that. I have learned many lessons, made new friends and last but not least, helped promote our sport and my supporters to the outside world.

Longboarding took me to numerous beautiful places, made me meet many awesome people and gave me many opportunities that would have never been possible without it.

I am more than curious what else there is to come.

Watch Behind the Scenes of “One With Gravity”

Additional links:

Photos in this article are screenshots taken from “Behind The Scenes of One With Gravity” video by DJI.

Yassine Boundouq skating in Morocco

Morocco culture through a longboard video by Yassine Boundouq

When first hearing about Morocco, most people think about surfing and deserts. But that doesn’t mean there’s no skate scene there. This wonderful country separated from Europe by the Straits of Gibraltar and surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea is know for its rich history and unique culture.

Yassine Boundouq is one of the skaters living in Morocco. He comes from the city of Safi and his mission is to develop the local longboarding scene and bring it closer to people. Despite not having great skateboarding conditions, like we have in Europe, Yassine still shares his love for the sport. Skating on tiles and bad pavement doesn’t hold him back.

[youtube url=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HKLFg-MQKus”]

His Longboard story a.k.a. MoulTawa Story represents the Moroccan way of living. Besides showing off his skills, the video creates a special vibe with lifestyle shots of the locals and architecture. The MoulTawa Story thus embodies Morocco and shows people how longboarding can fit into its culture.

Yassine Boundouq is an ambassador for Orangatang Wheels and Loaded boards.

Longboard Girls Crew France - Behind the scenes of filming a new video

French Girls Going Down – Behind The Scenes Photos by Alban Pernet

In June, the French Longboard Girls Crew found themselves filming a new video called French Girls Going Down. The filming took place on Espigoulier Pass, located near Marseille, France.

Anne Poursin, Marjorie Roméo, Lyde Begue and Laure Descloitres took two days off to skate a giant corkscrew road. Meanwhile, Augustin Joan-Montes from AJ Médias captured their motion and me, Alban Pernet documented their adventure with the lens of my camera.

This trip was an opportunity to appreciate the fast and feminine style of the girls riding, who are always happy and smiling. Even after two day of non-stop runs under the hot sun of Southern France.

The new French Girls episode features the following riders:

Anne Poursin (ROCKET Longboards, Politic Longboard Activist and Naitup Tent)
Marjorie Roméo (Wigga Skateboards)
Lyde Begue (Restless Longboards, RipTide and CDK)
Laure Descloitres (9.81 Swiss Boards and Idle Slide Gloves)

All of the girls are members of the Longboard Girls Crew France and the new Entre Couzs Collective.

Photos: Alban Pernet Photographiste

Lobo Wheels Gnarlicante Skate Trip

Lobo Wheels Gnarlicante Trip 2016

To survive the winter, a squirrel needs to stack about ten thousand pieces of nuts, acorns and pine-cones before the first snow hits. Tough life.

In general, as skaters living in a country where the weather is seasonal, sometime around the first autumn signs we need to think about charging our batteries to the maximum, just so we can survive winter.

Last year we came up with an idea to visit Spain and guess what, it was a straight bullseye. Without even the slightest hesitation this year early in April we started planning our next trip.

In 2015, Pablo Quiles, a well-known rider from Spain, showed us the ins and outs of Gnarlicante. So basically thanks to him, we now know the spots, local riders and the Spanish way of living.

An abandoned road in Spain. Photo by Rafał Czuber - Lobo Wheels Gnarlicante Skate Trip
An abandoned road in Spain. Photo by Rafał Czuber

Getting ready for the trip

When getting ready we tried to plan everything ahead so that nothing would surprise us and we could stay as low profile on the spots as possible. It’s very important for us to respect the spots and local riders that use them on daily basis.

Fortunately when it comes to the whole planning phase, we have a ruthless engineers Bartosz who doesn’t leave anything undone. So by the time we were leaving Poland, our map of roads we wanted to hit looked like a globe used as a shooting target for close range shotgun practice.

We had that covered. To get other things done we got in touch with David Butti from Salsito House. He offered us to stay at his home, helped us with the rentals and overall was an awesome host the whole week once we got to Spain.

I can easily skip the whole ‘omg excitement phase’ with the packing, the flight, the whole clapping after landing and the fact that we could easily throw our jackets to trash because of the 29 degrees in Spain, while in Poland people had to scrub windshields of their cars in the morning.

This year we managed to smuggle into Alicante the whole STWS so there were 7 of us. Next year we probably will bring our families and pets and in two years’ time we will most likely come back with all the crap we own and stay for good.

Lobo Wheels Gnarlicante Skate Trip
Bart skating Longboard Paradise with a view of Benidorm City. Photo by Grzesiek Kodzik

Skate all day, everyday

All jokes aside Spain has so many beautiful spots and such a unique climate to offer that I myself sometimes didn’t know wheatear I should laugh or cry, so I cried with happiness and enjoyed the trip as much as possible.

We had an ambitious plan to “skate all day, everyday”’ and to test the heck out of the new improved core mounted in LOBO wheels. In fact we calculated that in one week we should be able to pull around 12 skate sessions, counting the Gnarlicante King of the Hill Outlaw Race and Castell de Castells freerides.

The plan was simple…

Wake up, hit the market, eat at the spot (which I really like), skate, lunch somewhere at the beach, skate, dinner, relax, sleep, wake up and repeat.

Sounds a lot but to be honest, if the weather wouldn’t prank us for a day or so, we would most likely pull it off. Nevertheless, we still got tons of riding done and left behind loads of burned urethane.

Alicante is a region that offers hundreds of spots you can skate on.

I literally write hundreds because it’s true. Most likely if you’re a local rider 98% of the spots is invincible for you, but as pure “flatland boyz” we were stoked.

Of course in a weeks’ time we weren’t able to hit all of the spots we saw but we did the best we could playing it smart enough not to burn anything for the locals.

In my eyes Alicante region offers everything. From 30% grade slide spots, through awesome roads with small traffic to pure open road freeride experience with all kinds of other attractions.

Lobo Wheels Gnarlicante Skate Trip
Grzesiek Kodzik on the hills near Calp. Photo by Bart

So the whole week went by excellent.

During the day we were skating, having fun, stacking clips and snapping photos. Evening on the other hand we spent either relaxing in Salsito or just roaming the small town of Calpe, enjoying the late night life of elderly citizens. I’m telling you, it’s the Miami of Europe.

Fortunately the photographic equipment we took this year for the trip also levelled up, so thanks to the gimbal, a sweet GH4 and a handmade car mount, we were able to record many runs.

King of the Hill Outlaw Race

On the 14th, the Gnarlicante crew organised an outlaw race at on of their local favourites, a spot called “Psychospot“. This name actually comes from the one and only Pablo Quiles, who’s nickname is Psycho, so if you know Pablo or at least seen him skate, you get the drill about the spot.

The road itself does not forgive mistakes and brings genuinely tons of fun. Most of the surface is destroyed in one way or another. From huge cracks and random concrete humps to fairly large holes leaving just a small pass to go through. Add over a dozen degrees of grade plus a few corners and you got yourself a pretty interesting mixture.

I asked the locals why they love the spot so much and heard that the pavement is just perfect where it needs to be and the rest is just details. Frankly, that’s true but I myself think that besides that, Psychospot also offers tons of adrenaline and almost no traffic, plus the guys block the road while bombing.

Lobo Wheels Gnarlicante Skate Trip
Rafał Czuber charging down Psychospot while the locals cheer him on. Photo by Ty Mon

So, we skated a bit over there. Melvin Herrmann helped us with recording a run of Rafał and we moved on to another road to shot some more footage.

Eventually Melvin Herrmann was declared The King of the Hill by winning the outlaw race, which is well deserved since he is an awesome skater and also by the way has freaking mad driving skills.

Toti Bicileta was second with Adrian Leon Suñol coming in third and Oscar Archibaldo Rodriguez Escoin swooping the fourth position riding on the new LOBO Kraken Downhill series wheels.

During the Friday outlaw race we’ve run across the guys from Netherlands, Robbert and Jordi, with whom we already had a chance to skate at KnK in the past and at Castell de Castells freeride the next day.

Castell de Castells freeride

As I mentioned before, for our last day in the longboard paradise we decided to visit Castell de Castells freeride event organized by the guys from FreeDivision Crew. The freeride was a full weekend event but because of our flight we only attended the first day.

Castell de Castells is located in the mountains of south-east Spain. The town itself is very small and only has around 500 residents, but the freerides were organised on a public road connecting it with the next city.

Lobo Wheels Gnarlicante Skate Trip
Rafał Czuber on Castell de Castells freeride in the mountains near Alicante. Photo by Bart

When you look at the spot on findhills you might not be impressed because it’s only an average 6% grade, nearly 16% steepest point, barely 3 kilometres and just a few corners and sweepers but the point of view changes once you get inside that shuttle bus.

Believe me, it’s awesome. The whole course is not very demanding but you build up speed fast, the road is wide, the pavement is smooth and the corners are crazy-steep. What more could a skater ask for. We took some photos, had lots of fun and went back to Salsito with no losses.

Overall we had a great time!

We did everything we wanted to, including a very hard test of the new and improved cores in all models of LOBO Wheels, which by the way turned out great.

We filmed a lot of clips and snapped some photos to share amongst friends and homies but what is the most important thing, we got to skate with cool people, had a lot of fun and charged our batteries to help us survive the winter break.

Lobo Wheels Gnarlicante Skate Trip

Big thanks to David from Salsito House, who once again welcomed us in his home and proved to be a great host and thanks to Melvin for helping us record a sweet run of Rafał on Psychospot.

I’m pretty sure we will come back next year because Gnarlicante still has so much to offer and it only gets better and better.

Skate safe and have fun!
Tymon

Visit www.lobowheels.com to check out the whole longboard wheels lineup and visit Lobo Wheels on Facebook for newsfeed and everyday info about the company.

To follow all of our adventures check out my personal blog North of Poland and follow it on Facebook.

Kyle Wester’s downhill skateboarding speed record announced just a day before L’Ultime Decscent

Kyle Wester’s speed record of 143.89 kph announced just a day before L’Ultime Descente

Just as the L’Ultime Descente race is about to happen tomorrow to set the new world record for various downhill disciplines, Santa Cruz Skateboards and Kyle Wester announced Kyle’s successful attempt to break the downhill skateboarding record by reaching the speed of 143.89 kph (89.41 mph).

I’m still trying to comprehend this because of the massive 13 kph difference from the previous record set by Erik Lundberg being 130.63 kph in Les Eboulements. I guess it’s hard to imagine matching that speed as the L’Ultime Descente track is only 1 km long and the top speed for downhill skateboarding stand-up is around 130 kph+.

The location of the road where Kyle did his run is unknown to the general public.

Check out the speed suit!

What is known and you can see in the video (or see the screenshots below) is that Kyle used some kind of a special speed suit he developed in order to be as aerodynamic as possible and to be able to achieve the maximum speed.

Previous speed records

Erik Lundberg set a world record (WGSA) in Les Eboulements (Canada), documented by Red Bull in May 2016. His descent was measured at 130.63 kph and with going faster by just 0.55 kph, he managed to beat Mischo Erban‘s record of 130.08 kph, witnessed back in 2010 on a road in Colorado, USA.

But Erik Lundberg’s speed record is not safe anymore, due to a new three-day event happening tomorrow, where 100 downhill skateboarders will try to beat it.

L’Ultime Descente, World Speed Record 2016

Until now setting new speed records was kind of a private endeavor with just the athlete and officials recording the stunts and preparing the documentation required to obtain the title.

L’Ultime Descente welcomes locals and visitors to Les Eboulements to witness top line downhill skateboarders, street luge skaters, in-line skaters, and soapbox 2.0 drivers, descending down this legendary road.

The event will take place this weekend, from September 9th till 11th. During the time of the event, the road will be closed for traffic every thirty minutes, where riders will be able to do their run from 8 am to 18 pm.  For more info follow their Facebook event page here.

L'Ultime Descente 2016

So far we haven’t noticed any public riders list, but we’ve done some research and Erik Lundberg is flying in to hold his record, as well as Max Ballesteros, Pete Connolly, Emily Pross, Adam Persson, and Mauritz Armfelt, just to name a few…

To give you a taste of the drop, here’s a photo showing the top speed section.

Route du Port in Les Éboulements. Photo by Norman Richard via Panoramio.
Route du Port in Les Éboulements. Photo by Norman Richard via Panoramio.

UPDATE: Pete Connolly in the Guinness World Records as the fastest downhill skateboarder

In 2018 Pete Connolly, the fastest downhill skateboarder in the ”stand-up skateboard” category at L’Ultime Descente, got his record confirmed by the Guinness World Records, making his mark in the history of downhill skateboarding.

Dominic Schenk sends it down the Kozakov track full stand-up

Dominic Schenk sends it down the Kozakov track full stand-up

Dominic Schenk likes to challenge himself a lot and this summer he went for a full stand-up run down the Kozakov Challenge track. For many of us, a run like that is just a wet dream, but Swiss downhill skateboarder Dominic handles the 90kmh+ track with high precision “no hand down” slides with much style and ease.

Dominic Schenk filmed with a follow car at Kozakov Challenge 2016. Photo by <a href="https://www.cgsa.cz/" target="_blank">CGSA</a>.
Dominic Schenk filmed with a follow car at Kozakov Challenge 2016. Photo by CGSA.

With another Red Bull No Paws Down race being right around the corner, Dominic was excited to announce the challenge via his Facebook profile. I’m not sure if anyone actually tried to do it, but the likes showered and many were eager to watch the premiere broadcast of the run on the big screen at KnK.

Dominic announced the full stand-up Kozakov run on <a href="https://web.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1271058892934893&amp;set=t.100000923829937&amp;type=3&amp;theater" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">his Facebook profile</a>
Dominic announced the full stand-up Kozakov run on his Facebook profile

Full stand-up run time only 2:29:378!

Dominic’s full stand-up run down the Kozakov track took only 2:29:378, which would have been top 80 qualification time. I wonder if anyone will try to beat that time.

To get his skating on point, Dominic skates his own pro model deck “Domination” by ROCKET Longboards and RAD Advantage 80a wheels.

WATCH THE VIDEO
Dominic Schenk – Kozakov NoPawsDown

This amazing run was filmed with a follow car with Rasmus Klintrot behind the steering wheel.

Disqualified on the start line

During the racing, he blew the start too many times and unfortunately got disqualified from the competition. It seems that the excitement was too much to handle 🙂

Bad luck followed him to KnK Longboard Camp, where he got a stomach flu and had to cancel racing Red Bull No Paws Down. Last year he placed second, but unfortunately missed a chance to win the title. Next year maybe…

Finally podium!

However, Dominic also attended the Cult Single Set Survivors race during KnK Week #2 and shared the podium with Andreas Mangold and Florian Fellner.

Cult Single Set Survivors 2016 podium


To stay on top of his adventures, you can follow Dominic Schenk via Instagram or Facebook.

Patrick Lombardi wins Red Bull No Paws Down 2016 World Championship

Patrick Lombardi wins Red Bull No Paws Down 2016 World Championship

After five days of warming up on the Bear’s Guts, the riders were finally ready for Red Bull No Paws Down World Championship which took place on the last day of KebbeK KnK Longboard Camp 2016.

Red Bull No Paws Down World Championship 2016. Photo by CK Photography
Pablo Quiles (Gnarlicante) in the focus. Photo by CK Photography

This year’s Week #1 at KebbeK KnK Longboard Camp was blessed with good weather and we ended up by having in total only one full day of rain (two half wet days, Monday and Thursday). The rest of it was sunny and hot with the race day being the hottest.

Everyone had more then enough time to get used to the track and improve their stand-up sliding skills. The organisation crew was running things really smooth and delivered in average around ten runs per day.


Related: KebbeK KnK Longboard Camp Daily Updates & Videos


Half way through the event it was becoming more and more clear that the competition this year will be harder then last year. Everyone were shredding hard to keep up with the rest but nobody really stressed about the race. Good vibes and fun times with skate buddies were the main focus of every single individual.

All together there were 195 riders participating at this year’s KnK freeride and 117 signed up for the RBNPD race. Some of them later decided not to race for various reasons so in total 72 riders raced to qualify.

After one warmup and three quali runs, 32 riders qualified and raced in the four man heats followed by the freeride runs.

Semi-Final live stream by Emily Pross via @redbull Facebook page

During the seventh run of the day, Emily Pross chased down the racers in Semi-Final and streamed live video to Red Bull Facebook page.

Red Bull No Paws Down World Championship 2016. Photo by CK Photography
Emily Pross aiming for the apex. Photo by CK Photography

Emily got hurt during the run in the first hairpin, but despite the injury she skated all the way to the finish line. Everyone was amazed by her determination to finish the run. Later during the evening we were all very happy to hear the she’s OK.

Spiders coming!

Around 4:30pm the Consolation and Final heats dropped into the Guts. Both heats were intense and delivered much excitement to Corner 8 a.k.a. “The Root Corner”.

Red Bull No Paws Down World Championship 2016. Photo by CK Photography
From left to right: Ryka Mohammadian, Patrick Lombardi, Ian Freire. Photo by CK Photography

In the Final heat, RBDNP 2015 champion Ian Freire (Brazil) battled with Patrick Lombardi (Italy), Ryka Mohammadian (USA) and Nico Gallmann (Switzerland), but didn’t manage to keep his title. The stakes were high as the money prize for the first place was 1,000 Euros, for the second 500 and for the third place 300 Euros.

Red Bull No Paws Down World Championship 2016 Results

1st Patrick Lombardi (Italy)
2nd Ryka Mohammadian (USA)
3rd Ian Freire (Brazil)
4th Nico Gallmann (Switzerland)

The stoke level was off the chart as the young Italian gipsy became a new Red Bull No Paws Down World Champion, repping DB Longboards, Cloud Ride Wheels and of course, his Gispy crew.

After the Final heat, the rest of freeriders gathered around in the finish and carried the champions to the podium. It was epic!

This photo by Brandon DesJarlais (Moonshine MFG) says it all.

Red Bull No Paws Down 2016 podium. Photo by Brandon Desjarlais

Party time with NCODNC, DJ SEMO and ZUBLIME

As all the other nights, everyone got together at the party place where the champs walked the podium once again followed by a metal concert performed by NCODNC from Slovenia, rap concert by one the riders Emil Birch – ZublimE and of course, Joey Biedner and Sebastian Schneider spun the KebbeK Wheel of Misfortune. As DJ Semo played some wicked tunes, the crowd was getting more and more drunk… What happened next should stay in Osilnica 🙂

Huge shoutout to everyone who helped running the event especialy to Course marshals and the whole KnK organisation crew, Maga and Rob McWhinnie, Ry Swanton, the Red Bull crew and Hotel Kovač staff. Word up!

Special thanks to CK Photography for awesome photos 🙂


EVENT SPONSORS
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KebbeK Skateboards @ https://www.kebbek.com
Cult Wheels @ https://www.skatecultwheels.com
Sickboardshop @ https://www.sickboards.nl
Lush Longboards Ltd @ https://www.lushlongboards.com
Sabre Trucks @ https://www.sabretrucks.com
Fibretec Skateboards @ https://www.fibretec.ch
Alternative longboards @ https://www.alternativelongboards.com
Olson&Hekmati @ https://www.olsonhekmati.de
Orangatang Wheels @ https://www.orangatangwheels.com
Original Skateboards @ https://www.originalskateboards.com
Remember Collective @ https://www.epic-distribution.com/#!remember-wheels/cqlz
ROCKET Longboards @ https://www.rocketlongboards.ch
Root Longboards @ https://www.rootskateboards.com
The Cave @ https://www.longboardcave.com
Moonshine MFG @ https://www.moonshinemfg.com
Street Lizard Longboards @ https://www.facebook.com/streetlizard
Zero31 – Longboard Factory @ https://www.zero31.eu
L.O.B Longboards @ https://www.facebook.com/loblongboards
Arbor Europe @ https://www.facebook.com/arboreu
Skoa Trucks @ https://www.skoadesign.com
Longboardshop.eu @ https://www.longboardshop.eu
Newton’s Shred Longboard Shop @ https://www.newtons-shred.co.uk

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SektorF Skating Crew Feature

SektorF skating – Give back to the community and spread the stoke

If you’ve ever been a participant at a longboard event, especially a freeride, then you had the pleasure of enjoying some quality time with likeminded people with the same passion for our beloved sport. But why do so only on organised events, when you can do it on a day to day basis?

Meet the SektorF Skating Crew

A crew from the Bavarian forest in Germany, SektorF Skating are setting a good example for everybody in our community by promoting and growing the sport in their region. Although the scene there is quite small and involve mostly young people, that doesn’t kill their stoke.

SektorF Skating Crew

SektorF Skating Crew, from left to right :
Markus Penzkofer, Christoph Lipp, Julia Morgenstern, Richard Enzmann, Lukas Nürnberger, Philipp Hastreiter, Stefan Hari John, Moritz Wein and Nikolas Raith.

Their recent adventures involved bringing back a small skate park to their hometown, organising three skate festivals on their local tow lift and an outlaw race.

As that is only the beginning, they also plan on doing skate courses and an outlaw series, similar to the one in Freiburg, this autumn. If everything goes as planned, their agenda for the nearest future involves also a proper race next year or in the years to come.

Check out their latest video with Christoph Lipp, German junior champion for 2015 and team rider for Talwärts Boardshop Zwiesel, G.O.D. and Icone.

We have to give some major kudos to the crew as they are really doing something they love and spread the stoke amongst other skaters or skaters to be. Their mentality is that everybody can do it, so they do it too in their region.

SektorF Skating Crew at skatepark

The fact: SektorF skating crew got their name by a former military reconnaissance complex, used during the cold war on the mountain called “Hohenbogen”.

If you wish to get to know them a little better, then visit their Facebook page, give them a like and be on the lookout for their next adventure. Also check out their videos on Vimeo, pics on Instagram and get stoked!

Awesome video filmed with bicycle featuring Ferdi Mohr, Stefan Reinprecht and Alexander Mohr

Awesome video filmed with bicycle featuring Ferdi Mohr, Stefan Reinprecht and Martin Schræg

About a month ago, Ferdinand Mohr shared with me a video filmed by his brother Alexander Mohr, featuring him and his buddies Stefan ReinprechtMartin Schræg.

Rather then full raw runs, which have overcrowded our Facebook timelines in the past couple of years or more, I’m a great fan of “edits” because it takes much more effort to create them and personally I find them to be more interesting. This one impressed me very much.

When I finished watching the video, I was curious to find out more about it because just posting a video without any additional information really isn’t what I’m trying to do here on Longboard Magazine.

So, I asked Ferdinand to tell me a bit more about what went down that day and what I found out blew me away. It might not seam that big of a deal to you (hopefully it does), but to me this was special.

As I was watching the video, I thought that some scenes were filmed with a follow car, but it turned out that the guys used a bicycle in order to make the whole experience safer. How freaking awesome is that!?

I know that to many of you this might be nothing new and for sure it has been done before, but the way this video came out… These guys deserve some respect for sure.

While following and filming a skater down a hill on a bicycle might not be an option for every situation, for example, when skating downhill at higher speeds, this is a great option for youngsters who don’t have a car or a driving licence…or if they want to play it safe.

Hopefully this video will inspire other young skaters out there to try out something similar. For more stoke check out this photo from the shooting.

Filming a run with a bicycle. Photo by Sebastian Mohr

It all started last year when my brother, Alexander Mohr wanted to film a video with me, but we were wondering how to film, because we were afraid of filming with a car. That’s how we came up with the idea to film with a bike and his glide cam. It was a funny construction, but it worked really well. We went to spots all over Vorarlberg (Austria) and Liechtenstein. Big thanks to my brother and of course to the community! ~ Ferdinand Mohr

There you have it… It doesn’t necessarily take a car to make great video which would get noticed and appreciated 🙂

Kebbek Skateboards; A love affair with skating over 20 years long – Scabs, road rash and all

Kebbek Skateboards; A love affair with skating over 20 years long – Scabs, road rash and all

It’s 2008 and I just picked up skating for the third time in my life; I’m visiting New York for work but all my free time is spent pushing around Manhattan and learning how to slide from some amazing folks over in Brooklyn, I ask for a recommendation for a downhill board and I’m told to get a Kebbek.

But that’s not where this story starts, it’s just where I come into contact with one of the most focused board companies out there.

Rewind to 1992 and a young Ian Comishin returned to Canada after studying in Japan for a year, he decided to make skating a core part of his output to the world and started raising money by selling T-shirts under the name Powder Milk, which was the name of a store his friends ran in Japan.

After a short while he turned this into a full on Skateboard operation, now dubbed PM Skateboards.

Having grown up in the mountains of Kimberley BC, Population 8000~, where skateparks were a rarity, it wasn’t odd to find himself and a crew out on the hills or skating stairs sets, ledges or whatever they could find, at a time when Skateboarding was even more criminalised than it is today.

Photo courtesy of PM/Kebbek
“Mad racks of PM Big Bugger boards” Photo courtesy of PM/Kebbek

By the late 90s PM Skateboards had moved to Vancouver from Rossland, sponsored an all Canadian team of riders as well as having their boards produced domestically, having put so much attention and focus into supporting the scene it was only logical to spread the word to small towns and cities across BC.

This gave birth to the 1999 Hicks on Sticks tour that would bring live music and skateboarding to other small communities introduce new generations to the freedom that seemingly only piece of wood, metal and urethane can bring.

At a time when the internet was still in it’s infancy, getting the message out there took more effort than just a few clicks and boobs.

This tour is a story in itself and there’s even a documentary about it, you can watch the full version here:
iTunes – Hicks On Sticks

A fresh start

From the crippling debt of the tour a couple of seeds were sown, one of these continues to be benefit to the Vancouver skate scene to this day, while the other was the re-birth of PM Skateboards as Kebbek.

Having moved to Montreal to work and get everyone out of debt from the tour, Ian got in touch with Jody Wilcock and Jim Zielasnki (AKA JimZ), old friends from back home, and urged them to come and work with him in Eastern Canada in the province of Quebec, where the name Kebbek came from.

"Ye olde shop sign on Ville Emard, Quebec, where Kebbek operates" Photo courtesy of PM/Kebbek

Jody had designed lowered boards for Downhill Skateboarding, between him and JimZ they started supplying these to Landyachtz while still living in BC, when they moved to Montreal to join Ian, Kebbek was born and the concept of lowered boards moved into it’s heyday of the early 2000s with Kebbek prominently leading the market not only in design, but in research and production.

It’s thanks to work in robotics and CNC which Jody and JimZ brought to Kebbek that the level of detail and thought that went into each board meant that boards were produced with amazing consistency.
JimZ also produced some of the most early CNC trucks for longboards as well, the Speedparts truck, which is still a highly regarded truck today by those in the know.

"Ian in front of a stack of off-cuts from the CNC mill, holding his Signature board and successor to the Evo (AKA Comishin/JF Boily/Jon Caften" Photo courtesy of PM/Kebbek

At this time they were still producing boards for Landyachtz and Ian was behind the Evo’s design, arguably one of the more known lowered boards in downhill skateboarding, which made it’s way onto more podiums worldwide than possibly any board before or since.

Video: Re-edit of the Kebbek video for Concrete Wave DVD Evolution ~2006

Alongside these speedboards, Kebbek produced high quality slalom boards along with occasional PM homage models, in house artist Pierre Gravel supplied artwork for many years worth of ranges while also holding it down as a top contender in Slalom along with other Kebbek team riders Claude Reigner and Jean Pascal (Rockin’ Rookie).

Photos courtesy of PM/Kebbek
Aside from having lean your parents dream of, Pierre holds it down in many fields including art, running cones and putting on the odd ISSA event.
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“Before the BigZig revolution, you’d find the Kebbek team pre-drifting down some of the more fancy roads in Quebec city. Legend has it those toys are made by the Devil….” Photo courtesy of PM/Kebbek

The same ethos of a tight knit crew centred operation that was at the heart of PM is also a core belief in Kebbek, no other brand before or since in the world of downhill and slalom has ever supported so many riders with unique Pro Model boards.

This time though, riders outside of Canada found their names on a few boards, like Australian Legend Stephen Daddow, German master Bassi Haller to name a few.

“Race unknown, but JimZ in 1st, JF in 2nd, Jody in 3rd and Adam Colton in 4th.” Photo courtesy of PM/Kebbek

As the years went on, most of the early Kebbek team retired their models and made way for the young blood, but you’ll still see the legend’s names popping up here and there at events.

“JimZ developed the one handed approach to sliding toeside, even K-Rimes acknowledges this feat! https://goo.gl/Rmd12e” Photo courtesy of PM/Kebbek

To date, most of the technical achievements pioneered by Kebbek have gone on to inspire countless other riders and board designers worldwide.

"JimZ signature board; with CNC cut drop through for Randal 35 flushmounted baseplates..... such detail. I've read the Crail version was a fucker to do..." Photo courtesy of PM/Kebbek
“JimZ signature board; with CNC cut drop through for Randal 35 flushmounted baseplates….. such detail. I’ve read the Crail version was a fucker to do…” Photo courtesy of PM/Kebbek

It’s the constant drive to support their riders and skating as a whole that really sets the tone for Kebbek, while also pushing forwards with board design and this year we see a refined line up with 4 pro models and other models.

To me it’s never been so much about the brand, but instead the people behind it, with great skaters like Emma Daigle, Ben Dub, Amane Kishida and Juergen Gritzner putting out signature boards this year, I’m just as stoked about skating a Kebbek as I was back in 2008.

Moi, the author, trying to survive Peyragude 2Luxe Cup 2009 on my 1st Kebbek board, a JimZ. Still grab from Yvon Labarthe’s video
Life after deck: Why you should give your old board a new purpose

Life after deck: Why you should give your old board a new purpose

Skateboarding is a sport that is all about pushing the limits, where serious boarders are always trying to break into new territory with their stunts. But the pursuit of new frontiers can put a lot of stress on both the body and the board, with one major difference: a human can recover from a fall, whereas a skateboard can’t.

Broken Skateboard © Joe Shlabotnik https://flic.kr/p/EraKt
Broken Skateboard © Joe Shlabotnik

After suffering a serious bail, a board is usually irreparable and no longer in a good enough condition to be ridden on a day-to-day basis, leading many people to simply throw them away. The same often happens when a skateboard becomes worn out — at least in the eyes of a serious skater, as there is no real need to hold onto something that does not perform up to the high standards that they need.

According to Chasing Green, over 100,000 decks are produced in the USA every month, with the vast majority made from Canadian maple wood. These trees take 40-60 years to mature to the point they are suitable for processing into skateboards, and at the current rate of deck manufacture the unsustainability of this practice is fairly self-evident. It is of little surprise to discover that the skateboard industry is the number one cause of deforestation of maple trees in the world, even outpacing the furniture industry.

Thankfully, one of the new focuses within the world of skating is sustainability, with many skaters and deck companies finding ways to recycle old boards and create new more eco-friendly models. Liam Gleeson, skateboarding expert at Yakwax surf and skate store, strongly advocates giving young boarders a chance to enjoy the sport, even going out of his way to share his old decks with the local skaters.

He said: “I will quite often give my old decks to the younger kids at the skate park. Some of them will have squared off or delaminated boards, so I’ll take two or three of my old ones and give them away for free. My old decks still have a fair bit more skating left in them for a kid, and giving them away means they don’t just get sent to the landfill. I hope the sentiment gets passed on and that some of these kids might do the same kind of thing when they’re a bit older.”

Skateboarder's unity - Art by Haroshi
Skateboarder’s unity © Haroshi

Donating your old board to younger skaters is not the only way you can give them a new lease of life. Art and jewellery made from old skateboard parts are growing increasingly popular, with artists like Haroshi using the wood of old decks to create fascinating sculptures that burst with colour and vitality. He is not alone, with a recent art show called No Comply opening in Toowoomba, Australia that uses old boards to explore the evolution of skate design through the decades. There are also jewellery designers like Thrashion and Sesh who specialise in cannibalising old parts to make new and innovative accessories.

Environmentally friendly boards are also on the agenda, with several different companies taking the initiative to explore new tactics in ecological skate gear. Glide Skateboards and BambooSk8 are both producing decks using more sustainable materials than fresh maple wood — Glide uses reclaimed wood, while BambooSk8 utilises bamboo from managed forests. There are also companies like Comet Skateboards which take into account the bi-products of skateboard manufacturing and use green methods like water-based inks, zero-formaldehyde glues, and renewable energy in the making of their decks. The company also offers a service where skaters can send back their used boards to be recycled into new ones, receiving a nice discount on their next purchase.

With so many new ways of recycling broken and old skateboards, there is little reason why the skating industry can’t move towards becoming more environmentally friendly in the future. Follow the example of many of the visionaries mentioned in this article and think twice before you throw your old board away.

Newton’s Shred show Episode #008

Straight outta London, Newton’s Shred is a Longboard Shop and News Source focusing on the UK and sometime EU scene, I’m your host, Alex Ireton.

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Subscribe to our audio Podcast version:
Newton’s Shred – SoundCloud
Newton’s Shred – iPhone/iPod/iTunes
Newton’s Shred – Stitcher

Or for our video version:
Newton’s Shred – YouTube
Newton’s Shred – Facebook

You can also keep up to date with us on:
Newton’s Shred – Instagram

Joining me for this episode is Jorge Higgins, a local skater I’ve known for years, he now works in our shop and is supported by Lush Longboards and Slide Perfect Wheels.

I’m one of the owners here at NS and I’m a big fan of podcasts, so I thought I’d combine  my passion for skating, reporting and shop news into my favourite format: Audio
But then I thought, hey, I could just as easily record a video at the same time.

To learn more about me and our shop, I’d recommend you check out:
Longboard Magazine EU Intro YouTube only
Episode #000 : “Pretty much the head of everything..” YouTube iOS/iTunes SoundCloud Stitcher

Show Notes

Whassup

Recent Events
Brianne Collective: Fumble In The Valley Outlaw race – SkateSlate article by Will Edgecombe
BLBB Presents: Bo Peep session – Videos and photos by VIAL images
London Longboards: Beginner / Slide tips session

Upcoming Events
So You Can Longboard Dance?
Dance competition
Netherlands
April 2-3rd

Hog Hill Events in 2016
Downhill, Slide Jam, Slalom, Dancing, Buttboard freeride / race
England, UK
May, July and October

#BigMountainSkate Series
Alpenrauschen, Freeride, Austria, June 9-12th
Almabtrieb, IDF Race, Austria, July 13-16th
KNK Longboard Camp, Freeride, Slovenia, July 25-30th and August 2-7th
Bela Joyride, Freeride, Austria, August 24-27th
LoRaLo, Freeride, Austria, September 15-17th

Dishonourable mentions

SkateHouse 6 Thing Men In Longboarding Need To Stop Doing
SkateSlate 6 Things In Longboarding That Girls Need To Stop Doing
Alex Ameen Sketch Fest 2016 Pt 2 Video (Doesn’t allow embedding, sorry)
Goat Longboards Soul Dancer 42″ Deck announced
Sergio Valdehita 360 variations

Credits
Produced, shot and cut by Alex Ireton
Whassup jingle courtesy Dale Kean / PreCool
Dishonourable Mentions jingle by Ben Stainer
Images and videos via Kai Menneken and VIAL images
Big thanks to Jorge Higgins for joining me this week.

Christian Kreuter - CK Photography

Mastering longboard photography – The Christian Kreuter Interview

CK Photography – I guess most of you guys already got shot at least once by this guy. Christian Kreuter, the Kassel (Germany) local is not only a downhill skateboarding addict, but also a passionate photographer.

What’s he up to do next, where does his passion come from and how long does it usually take time for Christian to get that one perfect shot – read through to find out more. Enjoy!

How did you start with the photography and what inspired you to focus on longboarding?

Photography drew my interest when I was a little kid, because my grandpa was one of the first guys in our area that owned a SLR (analog single-lens reflex) camera back in the days. I was embossed by countless old school slide evenings with my grandpa.

I started skating back in 2012 and because I was using my DSLR for two years already, I just gave it a try and shot my first longboard pics with the local scene here in Kassel.

One year later I shot my first downhill event, the I-Berg Freerace. I didn’t skate back then, but I wanted to get a closer look at the “pros”. I attended a few other events in 2013 for skating and shooting.

After attending the Fairytale Freerace 2014, I got some inquiries from different skaters wanting to get a glimpse of my pics. One of them was TD Longboards founder Lennart Thomsen.

He asked me, whether he could get a shot of his teamrider Quirin Ilmer and indicated me to launch a Facebook page, so that all skaters could see my pics. I thought that was a good idea and a few days later I launched the Facebook page “CK Photography”, the feedback of which was really lovely.

KnK Longboard Camp 2014 ~ Facebook gallery by CK Photography
KnK Longboard Camp 2014 ~ Facebook gallery by CK Photography

The KNK Longboard Camp later in the year 2014 was my absolute highlight. Despite poor weather conditions I had some very unique runs with skaters, who I later became good friends with. KNK was pure madness (laughs).

One week later, after I finished my post production work, I uploaded the pictures on my Facebook page and the “likes” went totally crazy. I literally reached the whole world with my work. People love their sport and I can capture those moments, this is just an awesome feeling.

Are you planning to shoot any events in 2016?

Honestly I wish I could attend every BigMountainSkate event in 2016. I really respect all the work the guys do and I wish I could be part of it with my pictures. Almabtrieb, Alpenrauschen and Bela Joyride are definitely on my radar for 2016.

OH Rider Fionn Kraft at KNK 2k15 ~ CK Photography
OH Rider Fionn Kraft at KNK 2k15 ~ CK Photography

There are some big differences between a planned shooting for advertising and shooting at events. I really know this by myself. How about you? Do you shoot “planned” shootings as well?

No, not really. As I often shoot at events, I don’t plan that much, I like to do some extra detail planning on portrait shootings and landscape pictures. Sometimes I plan skate shootings, like a shooting at noon with a flash. Here you tell the skater the exact place where to slide or do a trick, but I am more into the “real” pictures, which are not set-up.

At an event you can’t really tell the skaters how to skate and what kind of shots you would like to get. How does it take to get good shots out of an event?

As you said, as photographer you can’t plan where the skaters skate and slide before a corner. Only when you skate the road by yourself, you know exactly when something is about to happen where and when.

Tech-talk alert! You shoot with a Nikon camera, right?

Oh yes, I am a real Nikon Fanboy 🙂 I shoot with a Nikon D800 Body since 2015 and in previous years I worked with a D7000.

What I want is maximum quality and the Nikon D800 provides me with 7360×4190 pixel photos when shooting raw format (info: raw means, that the photographer has to do the final development of the picture. Shooting with .jpeg files, the camera does the development and you get a finished picture).

Chris' gear for getting awesome shots

Only the burst mode is pretty slow of the D800, but I exclusively shoot with single exposure. This means I only have one chance to get the perfect shot. So if I miss the moment, it’s forever gone.

What lenses are you using for shooting downhill skating?

I am shooting 90% of all my skate pictures with the NIKKOR 70-200 2.8 VRII. When I shoot with a really wide open aperture, the pictures are pin sharp and on point and also the focus speed is really fast. And only for about 10% of my shots I use the Sigma 35mm 1.4 ART for landscape or campground shots.

What about post-production? How do you get the perfect image done?

I don’t make any difference, if it is people, landscape or skateboarding photography – I always check my basic rules, to see if I this is the perfect image.

  • Is the focus on point?
  • Is the exposure right?
  • Did I capture the right moment?

So straight after a skateboarding event, the picture selection can take some days. When shooting a three day event, I mostly have 800-1200 picture to look at, but I learned to keep the rejects small.

And when I know the pictures that suffice my criteria I do some small corrections and put on the “CKP Look”. Right after that, I do the easiest thing, but also the most satisfying part of my work – export the pictures for Facebook, upload them and share them with all the skaters out there.

Would you share some useful tips for all the hobby photographers out there?

Sure! Here are some tips:

  • So firstly don’t focus only on one photography topic. Take a look at the whole spectrum of photography, because you will learn a lot of things from one topic which you could use for another.
  • Secondly I would say, that creativity is the next important thing. Therefore you should look for new angles and try some different camera adjustments like aperture, exposure time, or shooting with flash.
  • Last but not least, I think you should take a look at other photographers and probably try to copy them or adopt stuff you like, to find your own photography style. Also, ask questions – talking with other photographers really helps and I honestly feel happy when I can help others. So contact me anytime you want!
  • Uh, and before I forget, I have some tech-talk information for you guys out there: The lens is way more important than the body of your camera set-up and you should get your hands on fast memory cards. It is really a pity, if the memory card is too slow to capture the right moment!

What other motives do you shoot besides longboarding?

I also shoot people, landscape and travel pictures and therefore I launched a second Facebook page at the end of 2015 for those kind of pictures. As you said, I recently shot a lot of skateboarding, but I want to broaden my mind and learn something new.

The good thing with photography is that you can shoot everything and therefore it is really necessary to look beyond the boundaries.

When shooting with people, I don’t want to catch an orchestration, I am more interested in people and how they live, what they have experienced or what makes him or her special. And when I’m shooting landscapes, I am aiming to capture pictures of touching places and where I can think back in time when looking at them.

Thank you Christian for a great interview and your insight into longboard photography. Any shoutouts?

Of course. I would like to thank everyone out there who support me and follow me on social networks. I’m very proud, that i can work with BigMountainSkate and Longboard Magazine. Special thanks goes out to my family and friends:- Mom and Dad, love you.- of course Grandpa, who has shown me the path to photography- my crew: Arthur, Fionn, Al, Philipp and Elias- the „Sonnenblümchen Racing Team“: haha, if you read this you will know who i mean 😉

If you’re in town, get in touch and we skate some hills together and take some photos. Otherwise, I hope to see you on the hill soon and keep safe. Cheers!

Longboard Speedmeter

Longboard SpeedMeter App – What’s your top speed?

Longboard Speedmeter

The folks from the Longboard Spotfinder app, have been consistently working on and improving the little sister of the Spotfinder, the Longboard SpeedMeter. We are stoked to announce that the SpeedMeter is available for both iPhone and Android, and is plastered with new features.

Use this app to record your run. See your top speed, average speed, distance, elevation drop, and even a recorded line on a map of your run. New features show you WHERE on the run you hit your top speed.

Did we mention its free?
Use this app to tweak your line to get to the bottom as fast as you can.

Download the Longboard Speedmeter

Download on Apple Store Download on Google Play

Filming a longboard run with a car

Stick to my ass as close as possible – filming a run with a car

Recently I watched a raw run video featuring Austrian racing machine Quirin “Qui” Ilmer. The Tyrolian beef-cake is really pushing his limits to the max and is always eager to get down the road as fast as possible. Check this raw run to make sure you understand what I’m talking about.

[vimeo 140597286 w=300 h=150]

Watching him hitting the roads in such vicious race mode makes me even more stoked about skating fast. Quirin doesn’t care if he’s racing against three other guys, when he’s on the top of the hill, it’s just a nip-and-tuck race between him and the road.

As I was wathcing the raw run video, I couldn’t overlook how damn close to Quirin the follow car was.

Did you realise how damn close to Quirin the car is as he hits the apex? That’s really close! Both the rider and the car driver are not allowed to make any mistakes in these kind of filming sessions.

This reminds me of all those SkateHouseMedia edits done by Alexander “Bad Decision” Ameen. Everybody knows him for beeing really fearless follwing down the skater as close as possible to catch some good footage.

But who’s the guy that rips down with a car like this over here in Europe? Let’s hear it from Quirin:

The filmer is called Nussi (Gregor Nussbaummüller). The wicked thing working with him is, that if you make a mistake, he knocks you over. And that’s the way it should be! The follow car has to stick to your ass as close as possible. Thats the way a raw run should be filmed these days, because then you get the best footage out of a run! ~ Quirin Ilmer

Nussi, a Salzburg (Austria) DH skater is responsible for this kind of action. As I talked to him about this later, he told me that he was putting his first car sideways all the time.

After he passed his driving license, his first car was a rear-wheel drive BMW and this kind of forced him to drift through corners, especially during winter when he was driving up to the mountains to go snowboarding. “Often I would end up in snow off the road”, said Nussi while laughing out loud.

Nowadays he still drives up to the mountains but mostly during summer. He either skates down or follows a skater with his car and a camera fixed to it as he sticks close to the skater’s ass to get the raddest footage possible.

When it comes down to filming with the car, Nussi has some strict rules.

It is very important to know who is in front of you. Every rider has an unique style and tries to transfer it to the road. Downhill bombing or some stand-up freeriding make a huge impact for filming. So mostly I like to skate a run together, to get to know the skater I am about to film. ~ Nussi

When Nussi and I got together, we decided to hit a fun and fast track somewhere close to Salzburg, to show you how he handles the car. If you pay attention closely, you will notice how he drifts “sideways” in a second corner!

[vimeo 147670334 w=300 h=150]

When going out filming a raw run, Nussi uses a tripod car mount and a Canon DSLR for filming in high resolution and 25 frames per second.
By the way, this raw run was filmed with a VW Polo, which is “small & crispy”, just as Nussi likes a follow car to be. Still, Nussi also has a slightly passion for big old cars 😉

I want to extend the boundaries of the human nature – The Steven Vera Interview

Landyachtz has been around for almost two decades. If you haven’t started longboarding just yesterday, you should know them very well by now, if not, you will get to know them soon enough for sure. Since day one, they’re pushing the scene by contributing with board development as well as supporting many talented skaters around the globe.

The team over at Landyachtz brings together an impressive mixture of personalities and skateboarding skills. Throughout the recent history of downhill skateboarding they’ve gained a well deserved worldwide recognition and have achieved a lot.

However, this year they stepped up the game by inviting Steven Vera to their OG crew, stretching its diversity more than ever.

Steven Vera © Jon Sevik
Steven Vera © Jon Sevik

Vera is American/Ecuadorian by nationality and currently 21 years young, residing in New York, where it all started for him. His positive attitude, diverse skateboarding style and life achievements at such a young age stand out in today’s crowded skateboarding scene. Getting to know and interview him was a great pleasure. Let’s drop in.

Vera’s backround

His journey on the board began around 5 years ago, back in 2010, while he was in high school in New Jersey. After graduating he moved to Brooklyn, New York for a short period before he started traveling. “The city and its people took me in like family“, he says, hence why he represents the City all the time.

Steven Vera © Jon Sevik
Steven Vera © Jon Sevik

Watching him flipping the board with such precision and so much steeze, one would probably think that he must have had a solid street skateboarding background before getting into longboarding, but he doesn’t. As he says, he loves the concept of skating in the streets though and he thanks the City of New York for that.

Street skating is rad and all but I like having a setup where I can do it all. From tre-flipping off a bank to going straight to DH/Freeride. I also like pushing fast on gusher wheels because when you’re on small hard wheels, chances of reaching from point A to B are not enough, at least for me.

At the time when Vera started longboarding, Bustin was big in Brooklyn and their OG crew (Solomon Lang, Adam Crigler, Cami Best, Marc Rodrigues, Paulie Connor) had a big influence on his drive which started gaining power rapidly. It didn’t take long for Bustin to recognize his huge potential and embrace his creative ways of skating. In 2011, he joined their team.

He had a great time with the Bustin family and he remembers the Broadway Bomb 2012 in NYC as one the raddest times they had together.

These guys took me in like family when I knew nobody in the city and that’s what I liked so much about it, for I didn’t feel like I was only representing the brand at the time, but those OGs who’ve given a positive approach to the community over here in NYC.

Back than, longboarders would often be disliked online by short sighted skaters who couldn’t bare that there’s much more to skateboarding than what they were doing. Vera was no exception, but that never brought him down. As he says, at the end of the day it only made him want to skate his style even more.

Steven Vera © Jon Sevik
Steven Vera © Jon Sevik

Showing his little brother that the possibilities of doing anything is in his reach if he would work hard for, was additional motivation that helped him pave his own way.

I don’t want to be normal, I want to extend the boundaries of the human nature, I want to be unique with my own style unlike anyone has ever seen. I want to be different.

Vera had a great time with Bustin, that’s for sure and his role in the company’s marketing was huge. But those days are now over. Talking openly about these things can be hard or somewhat unpleasant. I really appreciate his willingness to share with us the reason why he left, showing that he’s an open and honest person as well.

I left because that good old vibe left a long time ago. And it’s understandable when a company is growing to help out others but in my opinion, you should always remember who backed you up when you started. No beef though, I wish nothing but the best for the company and its riders.

The business of skateboarding

Some skaters have a hard time mixing business with skateboarding. Some might feel that combining the two alienates the reason why they started skating in the first place.

Steven Vera © Jon Sevik
Steven Vera © Jon Sevik

Feeling like being a marketing tool in hands of a businessman can easily lead to a loss of interest for pursuing the career as pro skateboarder. Here’s what Vera thinks about it.

Everyone has a different way of seeing it and for me, I believe skateboarding should somewhat be treated as a business if one wishes to get something back from it. Especially if you’re a company/mag/rider etc that is funding the sport in the progress. Take the Berrics for example, why do you think the future has been bright for them?

But as he points out, balance is the key.

That being said, I also believe you should always try finding the balance in remembering your roots and have fun doing it because at the end of the day, for me at least, seeing a kid of any age, any gender, be hooked on this sport and away from the negativity of this world tells me I’m doing something right.

Vera is grateful for all opportunities he got in every sense of the manner. He’s traveling at a young age, exploring and understanding different cultures. As he’s not taking part in school at the moment, though he feels that this has been his education so far and wouldn’t give it up for the world.

Steven Vera © Micheal Alfuso
Steven Vera © Micheal Alfuso
Steven Vera © Micheal Alfuso
Steven Vera © Micheal Alfuso

He’s open minded and doesn’t like staying in one field when it comes to making a living. He freelances a lot with modelling gigs, photography and projects he does with the companies he’s sponsored by. He also helps his father with his trucking business back in the east coast.

In addition to that he says:

Hell, I even work in the sponsored companies’ warehouse just because I support my companies’ big time and I always like to know what’s up with the fam!

When he started skateboarding, Vera never expected to do it professionally. Skateboarding has always been his canvas and as any artist with passion for their craft, one likes to perfect it, no matter what, he says.

A bright future with Landyachtz

It’s too soon to talk about it, I guess. But from what we’ve seen so far, Landyacthz is a company that’s loyal to the scene and riders who represent it. They obviously have a great time together and care much for each other so this sounds like a great place for Vera to settle down.

My mission is to, literally, Skate and Explore and get more work done with these guys! They really skate everything! And that’s something I’m really stoked about.

Landyachtz team @ Landyachtz
Landyachtz team @ Landyachtz

Vera hasn’t been skating in Europe yet but we hope to the see him fly over as soon as possible and urge Landyachtz to make it happen for him 🙂

Vera’s choice of Landyachtz decks

Landyachtz - The Tomahawk
Click on image to watch the video

LY Tomahawk 2015 – Vera’s Board of choice.
LY Loco 33 – when he hits the skatepark
LY Drop Carve 37 – when he’s heading to the city for a cruise and want to do a flat ground session
LY Dinghy – Vera’s go-to board when it comes to the store or running errands.

Shoutouts

Shoutout to my other sponsors Bear Trucks, Orangatang Wheels and Triple 8 Helmets for always constantly having my back and my parents!


Related links

Steven Vera official Facebook page
Jon Sevik – Photography
Michael Alfuso, Alfuso Film – Video production & photography
Landyachtz skateboards

Skate the Peaks – Ben’s tribute to Peak District’s amazing downhill skateboarding scene

About a month ago, Ben Holmes (Arbor Skateboards UK and Sucrose Wheels UK) released a longboard film “Skate the Peaks” as a tribute to Peak District’s amazing downhill skateboarding scene featuring some of the best UK’s longboarding spots and UKDH community members.

He’s been stacking the footage since April and it took him additional five weeks to complete the edit. The film covers 12 spots and according to Ben, the best would probably be a secret spot called “GK” or as mentioned in the movie, “a secret downhill testing facility”.

You might also be interested to watch some other notable Ben’s works, like “Lyndsay McLaren || Easy to Love” or “Slacklining Trip || The Lake District”.

Video - Lyndsay McLaren || Easy to Love
Video – Lyndsay McLaren || Easy to Love
Video - Slacklining Trip || The Lake District
Video – Slacklining Trip || The Lake District

Behind the scenes for Skate the Peaks 2015

There’s a nice interview with Ben about the making of the video over at Thrill’s website, in case you’re interested to find out how that went down.

You can follow Ben around via his Facebook page “Ben Holmes Media“.

Mirko Paoloni & Majanal Crew

Mirko Paoloni meets his homies from Majanal Crew for some grip n rip fun

During the summer holidays Mirko Paoloni (@pinguz23) had the chance to hang out with his homies, the Majanal Crew from Rome, Italy. Andrea Cararo, Lorenzo Carosi and Mirko spent most of their time scouting Rome’s surroundings for some new hills and found amazing downhill runs they’ve never skated before. Watch the guys rip and grip while enjoying a classic day up on the hill.

Featured skaters
Mirko Paoloni (Atlas Truck Co, Cloud Ride Wheels, G-Form, Easygoinc Longboards, Moreboards, Falla)
Andrea Cararo (Majanal Crew, Kahuna Shop, Knog)
Lorenzo Carosi (Majanal Crew, Kahuna Shop, Knog)

Skateboarding is fun and always should be – The Jürgen Gritzner Interview

Jürgen Gritzner is a badass and well known downhill skateboarder from Austria. He’s also the first and so far the only Austrian who’s got his pro model deck produced by a non-Austrian company. We’ve met for a chat and talked about how his relationship with Kebbek Skateboards started in the first place, how he ended up on the RAD Wheels and Caliber Trucks flow team as well, about his alter ego “Ill Eagle” and his views on racing. Let’s drop in!

Jürgen Gritzner shredding a bowl. Photo by Markus Knoblechner
Jürgen Gritzner shredding a bowl. Photo by Markus Knoblechner

“Be true to yourself. Skateboarding is fun and always should be.” ~ Jürgen Gritzner

Hey Jürgen! How are you dude?
I’m fine! Thank you for asking. Partying and skating with the homies, you know, the usual business.

Great! To start off, tell us about how you got hooked up with Kebbek Skateboards?
It’s funny how that went down. My buddy, Felix Rupitsch (Bigmountainskate.com) was partying at a local Bastl Boards Bash and met the German distributor for Kebbek. They talked, had fun and in the end he mentioned that Kebbek’s looking for a European skater to represent them. Felix told him some s*** about me, how I love skateboarding, creating music and art, plus all other kinds of things I care about very much. It all ended up with Kebbek being pretty excited to get me on board and the next time I’ve met Felix, he asked if I would like join Kebbek’s team. I said “F*** yeah”, got in touch with them and sealed the deal. Later on, when I was already on their team, I finally got to meet Ian, the founder of Kebbek Skateboards.

That’s great. So, Kebbek was your first sponsor. How did you manage to get involved with your other sponsors? You’re also on a RAD Wheels team, right?
Yes, Kebbek was my first sponsor. Joining their team spiked up my motivation to travel to the USA and get some skate action overseas. I went there by myself and got to know the Skate House Media dudes. We were skating together all days long. A year later, in winter 2012/13, I managed to get back to the States, but this time I went with my homie Flo Wagner (Landyachtz Longboards, Hawgs Wheels) and we stayed there for five weeks. We’ve met Louis Pilloni in San Diego and showed us around the Sector 9 headquarters. That was exciting. He hooked us up with some wheels and a bunch of stickers. Loads of stickers. At some point, he finally turned over to me and asked “You wanna join the RAD crew?”. You can assume what my answer was, haha!

Jürgen Gritzner at Bela Joyride 2015 © CK Photography
Jürgen Gritzner at Bela Joyride 2015 © CK Photography

Of course, your answer was “F*** yeah!”. And you’re repping the Caliber Trucks as well, right?
That’s true, yes. It was not long after we’ve returned back home to Austria when I received a phone call from Dave Tinachi. He told about James Kelly joining the Caliber Trucks, but what really flipped me, was when said how each pro skater on their team gets to choose one “flow team rider” as well and that James chose me! Pretty rad!

What’s expected from you as a team rider for Kebbek and the other sponsors?
Basic stuff, you know. Going out skateboarding, snapping some shots and doing some other media works, like movies and sharing online. Once I mentioned that I would enjoy doing some graphics as well and Ian gave me the chance to do the designs for some flyers, stickers, posters and similar for Kebbek in 2014. Later that year, I also proposed that we could produce a promotion video for my pro model boards. Teammates Katiana Torrebella and Benjamin Dubreuil joined the party and we went on a nice skate trip for filming in a skateboarding heaven, Barcelona. My homies over at Frame Fatale from Vienna did a really good job filming and editing this movie.

That’s a great video. How did you end up with pro model boards?
After ISPO 2013, Ian and I really got to know each other. After we did a promotion tour across Europe he arranged a job for me in a German company where he was working as well. We talked a lot about skateboarding, my visions and other stuff. I guess he enjoyed having me around and wanted to push my skateboarding even further. He kind of mentioned once something about the pro model deck, but it didn’t seem to be so serious at that time. It was as all nice and chilled until at ISPO 2014 he pulled out a catalogue with the new boards. As I had a look at it, I saw my pro model downhill and pool decks in there. A big surprise! F***, Ian just knew that I also love to shred trannies and street. I was very happy about it.

Jürgen Gritzner - Alps by Kebbek Skateboards
Jürgen Gritzner – Alps by Kebbek Skateboards

So, Ian kind of secretly examined your skateboarding mind?
Haha! Well yes, if you want to put it that way. In order to pull that off with the pool deck, he definitely had to sneak into my mind. Regarding the downhill deck, he already knew what I like. I told him that I would love it if the board would feature a kicktail to be able to play around and that a platform has to be wide enough for my big feet. The same goes for a solid concave and a rocker. He did a pretty good job! I got even more stoked about it when he included “Ill Eagle” in the graphics for both boards.

What is “Ill Eagle”?
It’s kind of my alter ego, my artistic name. For example, I build skateboards with old snowboard moulds and create lots of art pieces with my hands. And in the end, it stands a symbol of my rebellious personality and skateboarding style. I’m always flying around! Haha!

Jürgen Gritzner - Ill Eagle
Jürgen Gritzner’s alter ego Ill Eagle
Jürgen Gritzner in his workshop
Jürgen Gritzner in his workshop

Most people know you for your badass freeride style, but probably for some racing as well as you where “flying” at Kozakov back in 2014. Where do you draw a line between racing and freeride?
Phuu, I think those two are hard to separate. Personally, I think in racing there are moments and situations which almost never happen while freeriding. And this is good as it is. Those special moments give me the thrill of racing on a skateboard. Only in racing you push your limits to 110%.
With freeriding it is just all about fun, racing is really serious. I never freeride without my homies. You know, I want to enjoy a good sunny day full of skateboarding without any stress and unhealthy competition.

Jürgen Gritzner at PND 2014 © Dmitri Elson
Jürgen Gritzner leading the pack at PND 2014 © Dmitri Elson

But you are still a competitive skater?
Hm, that’s a hard question. Probably, there are times when I get extra ambitious, especially when racing. But I’m not that eager for winning like some riders out there, who are ready to subordinate everything just to win a heat or a race. I’m definitely not that kind of a skater. I love racing and getting that adrenaline rush, but some people are just going to crazy about winning. You can often see how they f*** each other up. This is not something that I stand for. What we do when racing is still skateboarding. Be true to yourself. Skateboarding is fun and always should be.

Great words and a nice closure for our interview. Any more last words, Jürgen?
Yes, I think so as well. Go out, skate and have fun. And of course big thanks to my sponsors Kebbek Skateboards, RAD Wheels and Caliber Trucks as well as a big shoutout to my homies!


Follow Jürgen Gritzner via Facebook or Instagram.


Also check out The Juergen Gritzner transportation project